Mechanisms of chromosome duplication & genome maintenance

Karim Labib's Lab

Welcome to our website!  We study how eukaryotic cells duplicate their chromosomes faithfully during each cell cycle.  Defects in chromosome replication are central to our understanding of the earliest stages of cancer development, and a deeper understanding of chromosome duplication is likely to lead in the future to novel cancer therapies.  We want to understand the structure, mechanisms and regulation of the molecular machine known as the replisome, which assembles at replication forks and then is taken apart at the end of chromosome replication.  Most of our experiments utilise the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a powerful model system for studying eukaryotic chromosome replication.  But we also want to answer questions that are specific to higher eukaryotes, and these have taken us into studying early embryos of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, together with mouse embryonic stem cells.  Please read on to learn more about our research, the people who work in the lab, and our location in Dundee.

Karim's lab is located within the MRC PPU, which is part of the School of Life Sciences in the University of Dundee.
Karim's lab is located within the MRC PPU, which is part of the School of Life Sciences in the University of Dundee.