University of Dundee

Latest News for 10/2021

October 2021

  • Professor Sir Philip Cohen in research lab with two scientists working at the bench in the background wearing lab coats and facemasks
    07 Oct 2021

    Professor Sir Philip Cohen, one of the major influences in establishing Dundee as an international centre of excellence in life sciences research, has marked his 50th anniversary of joining the University of Dundee. Sir Philip is now looking to encourage the next generation of researchers with the launch of a charity to support PhD scholarships for the next 24 years, in memory of his late wife Tricia.

November 2020

  • From left: Nicola Darling and Kris Clark
    03 Nov 2020

    Research by Kris Clark, a former postdoc in Philip Cohen lab, led to the discovery eight years ago that the SIK subfamily of protein kinases suppress the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by phosphorylating and activating CRTC3, co-activator of the transcription factor CREB.  Excitingly, pharmacological inhibition of the SIKs greatly enhanced the production of IL-10, and transformed macrophages from an inflammatory M1 state to an anti-inflammatory M2b state that is thought to be important for the resolution of inflammation and the repair of tissue damage.

October 2019

  • 01 Oct 2019

    On October 1st 1969 Philip Cohen became a postdoc in Edmond Fischer’s at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA and started his research on protein phosphorylation. At that time only three protein kinases had been identified and protein phosphorylation was thought-to-be a specialised control mechanism confined to the regulation of glycogen metabolism.

June 2019

  •  Ian Kelsall and Jiazhen Zhang
    18 Jun 2019

    About 10 years ago, the discovery of the Linear Ubiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC) revolutionized our understanding of how the master transcription factor NF-kB was activated.  LUBAC a complex of the three proteins, HOIP, HOIL-1 and Sharpin, produces unique “linear” ubiquitin chains in which ubiquitins are joined to each other by peptide bonds.

November 2018

  • 05 Nov 2018

    The success of a University of Dundee collaboration that has attracted almost £60 million of investment, helped develop dozens of drugs for clinical use and won the prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Award will be celebrated this week. Scientists, politicians and representatives of some of the world’s biggest pharmaceutical companies will come together to mark the 20th anniversary of the University of Dundee’s Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT).

May 2018

June 2017

  • 23 Jun 2017

    About five years ago, researchers in Philip Cohen’s lab discovered that a family of protein kinases, termed the Salt-Inducible Kinases (SIKs), keep macrophages in the pro-inflammatory state needed to combat infection, and that compounds suppressing SIK activity switch macrophages to an anti-inflammatory state that is critical for the resolution of inflammation.

  • 02 Jun 2017

    The protein TRAF6 is essential for the operation of many physiological processes, ranging from the development of sweat glands and the formation of bone to the operation of the innate immune system.  TRAF6 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and, for many years, it has been widely accepted that it is this enzymatic activity that mediates the essential functions of the protein.

January 2017

February 2016

  • 10 Feb 2016

    A Japanese delegation visite the Wellcome Trust Building at the University of Dundee to initiate a partnership seeking to develop new treatments for inflammatory diseases.   Scientists and executives from Ono, Japan’s oldest pharmaceutical company, met with Professor Sir Philip Cohen and leading researchers from the University’s School of Life Sciences to mark the start of the collaboration, which will see the Dundee team help Ono to launch a new drug discovery project.  

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