University of Dundee

all News

September 2021

  • Professor Kim Dale
    06 Sep 2021

    Professor Kim Dale has been appointed as Assistant Vice-Principal (International) for the University of Dundee. Kim Dale is a Principal Investigator in the Division of Cell and Developmental Biology. Kim is well known to many staff for her work in the international field. This includes throught her roles at a School (as Associate Dean, International) and the University levl (as Academic Lead for International activity in the ASEAN region). She is a visiting Professor at Taylor's University, Malaysia. 

January 2021

  • Top row from left: Ingo Hein, Jens Januschke, Steve Land. Bottom row from left: Beatriz Baragana, Sheriar Hormuzdi and Susan Wyllie
    20 Jan 2021

    Ingo Hein, Jens Januschke, Steve Land, Beatriz Baragana, Sheriar Hormuzdi and Susan Wyllie promoted as part of the 2020 Annual Review process for academic staff. Inke Nathke, Interim Dean of School said, “I am delighted to congratulate Ingo Hein, Jens Januschke and Stephen Land on their promotions to Reader, Sheriar Hormuzdi to Senior Lecturer and also Beatriz Baragana and Susan Wyllie. It is a fitting acknowledgment of their outstanding contributions to research and teaching and I am proud to have such accomplished colleagues in our School.”  Ingo Hein

April 2020

  • Model for the full-length human OGT
    28 Apr 2020

    Researchers in the School have discovered a new neurodevelopmental disease caused by genetic mutations and helped explain why patients with these mutations suffer this condition. Around 1% of the global population are affected by intellectual disability, a condition characterised by significant limitations in both intellectual function and in adaptive behaviour. It was known that a molecule called GlcNAc was found on proteins related to intellectual disability, but its exact role in this disease remained unclear.

February 2020

  • Megan Bergkessel and Leeanne McGurk
    10 Feb 2020

    Megan Bergkessel and Leeanne McGurk have been awarded funding from the Springboard scheme of the Academy of Medical Sciences, which is designed to help early career researchers establish their independent research programmes.

December 2019

  • From left: Leeanne McGurk, Megan Bergkessel and Gabriel Sollberger
    04 Dec 2019

    The School has welcomed three new group leaders in recent months. They are currently establishing their laboratories across three of our divisions. Leeanne McGurk has joined the Division of Cell and Developmental Biology, Megan Bergkessel has joined the Division of Molecular Microbiology while Gabriel Sollberger has joined the Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology. Leeanne McGurk Leeanne joins the School from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia where she was a postdoctoral research associate in the laboratory of Nancy Bonini.  

April 2019

  • Professor Kim Dale
    19 Apr 2019

    Latest research from Professor Kim Dale and collaborators has uncovered further knowledge into the developmental segmentation process which may also impact on our understanding of diseases such as cancer. This research was published this week in EMBO Reports.

  • 11 Apr 2019

    Professor Kate Storey has been awarded the Waddington Medal by the British Society for Developmental Biology. The Waddington Medal is the only national award in Developmental Biology. It honours outstanding research performance as well as services to the subject community. The medal is awarded annually at the BSDB Spring Meeting, where the recipient presents the Waddington Medal Lecture. Professor Storey is Head of the Division of Cell & Developmental Biology and Chair of Neural Development in the School of Life Sciences at Dundee.

November 2018

  • Dr Greg Findlay
    19 Nov 2018

    Dr Greg Findlay from the Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit (MRC PPU) and an associate of the Division of Cell Development and Biology has been awarded tenure today.

October 2018

September 2018

  • Dr Nicolas Loyer and Dr Jens Januschke
    14 Sep 2018

    Asymmetric cell division is the process through which one cell divides into two cells with different identities. It is of particular importance for stem cells, which divide asymmetrically into another stem cell (thus self-renewing themselves) and a cell destined to become a more specialised cell type, such as for example a neuron or a muscle cell. A model of choice for the study of asymmetric stem cell division are neuroblasts, neural stem cells of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

Pages