University of Dundee

Latest News for 09/2021

June 2021

  • Professor Hari Hundal
    11 Jun 2021

    In recent weeks staff who teach on Biological and Biomedical Sciences programmes have been recognised in the DUSA Student-led teaching awards and the BBSE awards. Professor Hari Hundal won in the Most Inspirational Teaching category of the DUSA Student-led teaching awards for the third year running while the team award went to the Physiology and Pharmacology and Biomembranes Teaching Staff led by Hari.

May 2021

  • A smiling woman with bob length curly dark brown hair wearing a white lab coat and holding up a corn of barley in her right hand.
    21 May 2021

    Plant Scientists at the University of Dundee and the James Hutton Institute (JHI) have won funding to establish a partnership with world-class researchers in Australia. This will allow the leading research organisations to pool their expertise towards advances in cereal science, specifically in barley developmental genetics and transcriptomics.

March 2021

  • Cross-section of a barley flower immunolabelled. Credit: Dr Laura Wilkinson
    18 Mar 2021

    The productivity of cereal crops could get a boost in the future thanks to the discovery of new roles for a master gene regulator that influences the development of barley florets, furthering the understanding of grain development including impacts on grain shape and yield. A new study from the University of Dundee and the James Hutton Institute, working with partners in the UK and Australia, has shown that a gene encoding a protein called HvAPETALA2 (HvAP2) has a role in the development of florets and grain.

November 2019

  • Dr Sarah McKim in the lab holding a piece of barley
    12 Nov 2019

    Dr Sarah McKim from the Division of Plant Sciences has been awarded tenure. Sarah’s research explores genetic and molecular mechanisms which control how cereal plants develop. In particular, her lab focuses on understanding the developmental genetics of architectural traits in barley which can influence grain yield and quality. 

May 2019

  • Dr Sarah McKim
    17 May 2019

    Cereals provide more calories in the human diet than any other source and their grains underpin beer and whisky production across the globe but we have ‘barley’ begun to harvest the secrets of our cereals, says a University of Dundee plant scientist. Dr Sarah McKim, who specialises in the developmental biology of plants, will help the public gain an insight into the importance of our cereals by sharing how ground-breaking research in Dundee is increasing our understanding of how genes control cereal growth.

  • Hari Hundal and Sarah McKim
    12 May 2019

    Professor Hari Hundal and Dr Sarah McKim were named winners in their respective categories in the Dundee University Student Association (DUSA) Student-led Teaching Awards on Friday night. Hari jointly won in the Most Inspirational Teaching category while Sarah won the Best Postgraduate Supervisor category. The shortlisted nominees (from over 300 nominations) and the students who nominated attended the Student Led Teaching Awards Dinner last Friday, where the winners were announced.

December 2018

  • Dr Sarah McKim holding some barley
    05 Dec 2018

    New gene combinations in barley could prove a budding success for breeders and brewers across the world, according to a new study by plant scientists at the University of Dundee and the James Hutton Institute. The study, published in New Phytologist, suggests new barley lines created by bringing together novel genetic variation, could dramatically benefit the brewing and distilling industries by offering improved grain quality.

January 2018

  • 22 Jan 2018

    Last week, at Review of the Year, Professor Julian Bow presented the annual School Prizes. The awards recognise excellence by members of the School in research and public engagement.

  • Sarah McKim
    10 Jan 2018

    A University of Dundee academic has been awarded more than £600,000 to study an increasing problem with the cereal crop barley that impacts the commercially important malting process and the shelf-life of animal feed.  Dr Sarah McKim, a School of Life Sciences researcher based at the James Hutton Institute, was awarded a BBSRC research grant to investigate the unfavourable trait, called ‘skinning’, and to develop tools to track it in breeding populations.  

October 2017

  • James Hutton Institute
    17 Oct 2017

    Scientists from the International Barley Hub have discovered a genetic pathway to improved barley grain size and uniformity, a finding which may help breeders develop future varieties suited to the needs of growers and distillers.

Pages