University of Dundee

Latest News for 11/2021

October 2021

  • Professor Mike Ferguson
    05 Oct 2021

    In two papers just published in eLife and PNAS the Ferguson lab, in collaboration with Steve Beverley and colleagues at Washington University, St Louis, USA, describe the presence of a fucosyltransferase in the mitochondria of the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major.  

September 2021

  • Sam Duncan and Rupa Nagar
    23 Sep 2021

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are enzymes that transfer sugars from donor to an acceptor molecule. There are dozens of GT gene families, classified by sequence, sequence motifs and enzymatic function. GTs are defined by their donor and acceptor specificities and the type of glycosidic linkage they make. For example, a UDP-Gal : ßGal ß1-3 galactosyltransferase transfers galactose from UDP-Gal to a ßGal acceptor residue in a ß1-3 linkage (making a Galß1-3Galß1-R product). 

June 2021

  • Professor Mike Ferguson
    14 Jun 2021

    Almost half a million rapid diagnostic tests developed from research at the University of Dundee will be donated with the aim of helping eliminate the disease known as African sleeping sickness. The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) have announced that 450,000 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) will be donated by global healthcare company Abbott to scale up testing for sleeping sickness. Research in Dundee, in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, led to the development of the BIOLINE HAT 2.0 test, which will accelerate the efficiency of testing.

March 2021

  • Ageing Society
    11 Mar 2021

    The impact that an ageing population has on the health and wellbeing of individuals, groups, communities and societies, and what we can do to address these challenges, will be the focus of a University of Dundee lecture.

February 2021

  • 19 Feb 2021

    Work to build on Dundee’s world-class expertise in biomedical sciences is set to begin in earnest after the ‘Growing the Tay Cities Biomedical Cluster’ project was officially signed off by the Tay Cities Region Joint Committee today (February 19). The project will help the post-COVID-19 recovery through the development of new medicines, innovative medical technologies and the provision of high-quality new jobs, according to the University of Dundee academics leading it.

October 2020

  • 26 Oct 2020

    National UK SPINE initiative created to help us stay healthy in later years Innovative research aims to target the processes behind ageing rather than treating individual diseases Flagship projects include new pipeline to transform and accelerate development of ageing therapeutics Number of people over 75 in the UK will be one in seven by 2040, with challenges for health and care services alongside opportunities to improve quality of life

March 2020

  • Architect’s image of the proposed Innovation Hub
    02 Mar 2020

    A project to grow the Tay Cities Biomedical cluster of world-class life sciences companies will generate hundreds of millions of pounds for the local economy and strengthen Scotland’s reputation as a centre of excellence, according to new economic analysis. The proposed Tay Cities Biomedical Cluster, led by the University of Dundee in partnership with NHS Tayside, has been earmarked for £25million in initial funding from the Scottish Government through the Tay Cities Deal.

July 2019

  • Professor Sir Mike Ferguson
    02 Jul 2019

    Mike Ferguson, Regius Professor of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee, has today received a knighthood for his services to science. Professor Sir Mike, one of the UK’s most eminent life scientists, received the award at Holyrood on Tuesday 2 July after his accolade was announced in the most recent New Year’s Honours list.

December 2018

  • 28 Dec 2018

    Professor Mike Ferguson, Regius Professor of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee, has received a knighthood in the New Year’s Honours list. Professor Ferguson has been honoured for his service to science.

  • 28 Dec 2018

    Parasitic protozoa called trypanosomes synthesize sugars using an unexpected metabolic pathway called gluconeogenesis, according to a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens. The research led by Professor David Horn's team, in particular lead author Dr Julie Kovarova, in collaboration with Professors Mike Ferguson (Dundee) and Mike Barrett (Glasgow) note that this metabolic flexibility may be essential for adaptation to environmental conditions and survival in mammalian host tissues.

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