University of Dundee

Latest News for 07/2019

November 2018

  • Dr Greg Findlay
    19 Nov 2018

    Dr Greg Findlay from the Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit (MRC PPU) and an associate of the Division of Cell Development and Biology has been awarded tenure today.

August 2018

  • Dr Greg Findlay and Dr David Murray
    21 Aug 2018

    Two University of Dundee scientists have been awarded prestigious fellowships worth more than £1 million each to fund their research over the next five years. Dr Greg Findlay and Dr David Murray received Sir Henry Dale Fellowships that will enable them to develop the work and profile of their laboratories. Two postdoctoral positions will also be created at Dundee’s School of Life Sciences as a result of the award.

May 2018

  • Francisco Bustos and Anna Segarra-Fas
    10 May 2018

    New research by Greg Findlay’s group in the MRC-PPU has made progress in understanding the fundamentals of intellectual disability, a developmental disorder thought to affect 1-2% of the world’s population. The paper by Francisco Bustos, a post-doctoral investigator, and Anna Segarra-Fas, a PhD student in Greg’s lab, shows that genetic mutations found in intellectual disability patients impair the catalytic activity of an E3 ubiquitin ligase called RNF12.

July 2017

  • 03 Jul 2017

    Research by Rosalia Fernandez-Alonso, a post-doctoral investigator in Dr. Greg Findlay’s lab in the MRC-PPU, has been published in and featured on the cover of the July edition of the journal EMBO Reports. The paper identifies a new type of molecular switch involving BET bromodomain proteins, which enables embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into mesendoderm, an important precursor cell that gives rise to tissues and organs such as pancreas, liver, heart and blood.

August 2016

  • 17 Aug 2016

    Scientists from the University of Dundee have discovered a key regulator of embryonic stem cell identity, research that could one day lead to new treatments for heart attack patients and those with congenital heart conditions. Embryonic stem cells have the potential to provide tissue replacement therapies for a number of debilitating diseases due to their capacity to differentiate into any cell type in the adult body, a property known as pluripotency.