University of Dundee

Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression

Short Code: 
GRE

Viva success for Laura D’Ignazio

Congratulations to Laura D’Ignazio from Professors Sonia Rocha and Ron Hay’s labs for passing her PhD viva!

Laura’s thesis was entitled ‘HIF and NF-kB Crosstalk: The role of HIF-1B as an inducer of the inflammatory response’. Her internal examiner was Professor Albena Dinkova-Kostova from the School of Medicine and her external examiner was Professor Lienhard Schmitz from the University of Giessen, Germany.

Success at the Undergraduate Awards 2018 for Life Sciences Students

Three of our undergraduate students were recognised in the Undergraduate Awards 2018. Emma Sands, Emily Scott and Daniel Squair were Highly Commended in the Life Sciences category. This means that they were in the top 10% for their category and this included entrants from students across the world! The awards aim to celebrate top undergraduate coursework and foster interdisciplinary collaboration between students and recent graduates worldwide. Our students submitted work based on their fourth year honours project.

BBSRC EASTBIO PhD Programme: The link between protein O-GlcNAcylation and intellectual disability

Understanding and controlling the balance between pluripotent self-renewal and differentiation is the major aim of the field of stem cell biology and it is the limiting factor for successful, safe, widespread use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in a clinical setting. In recent years it has become clear that these ESC functions are regulated by environmental cues (growth factors, nutrient supply, other cells) via signalling pathways operating on several proteins.

BBSRC EASTBIO PhD Programme: How growth signals regulate replication licensing and cell division in normal and cancerous oesophageal cells

In order to maintain genetic stability and prevent the amplification of chromosome segments, the process of DNA replication occurs in two strictly non-overlapping phases. In late mitosis and G1, DNA is ‘licensed’ for replication by being loaded with double hexamers of MCM2-7 proteins. Then, during S phase, replication forks initiate at these licensed origins. Defects in regulation of the licensing system are associated with a variety of diseases including cancer and growth disorders [1].

BBSRC EASTIO PhD Programme: Identifying proteoforms as disease biomarkers from large scale proteomics and transcriptomic data

Self-assembly of larger protein networks is a central feature of replicating systems from viral capsids to the cytoskeleton that gives cells structure and polarity. One important example is the nuclear lamina, a subset of the cytoskeleton responsible for nuclear structural integrity, controlling the demarcation between active and inactive chromatin and the developmental control of gene expression programs.

BBSRC EASTBIO PhD Programme: Revealing dynamic and elusive early-mitotic events using state-of-the-art live-cell light sheet imaging

To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes properly to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This process has important medical relevance because chromosome mis-segregation plays causative roles in human diseases such as cancers and congenital diseases. To prepare for proper chromosome segregation, kinetochores – the spindle attachment sites on chromosomes – must correctly interact with spindle microtubules (MTs) during early mitosis.

4 Year Wellcome Trust PhD Programme: How growth signals regulate replication licensing and cell division in normal and cancerous oesophageal cells

In order to maintain genetic stability and prevent the amplification of chromosome segments, the process of DNA replication occurs in two strictly non-overlapping phases. In late mitosis and G1, replication origins are ‘licensed’ for replication by being loaded with double hexamers of MCM2-7 proteins. Then, during S phase, replication forks initiate at these licensed origins. Defects in regulation of the licensing system are associated with a variety of diseases including cancer and growth disorders [1].

4 Year Wellcome Trust PhD Programme: Investigating mRNA cap regulation in ES cells and T cells

We investigate the regulation and function of the mRNA cap, a modification of RNA essential for gene expression which integrates transcript processing and translation.  We are beginning to understand how oncogenes and signalling pathways can regulate gene expression via regulation of mRNA capping enzymes. Signalling pathways which modify the mRNA capping enzymes have the potential to change the gene expression landscape, thus causing changes in cell physiology. 

4 Year Wellcome Trust PhD Programme: Mechanisms of chromosome segregation in mitosis

To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must properly segregate their chromosomes to daughter cells during their cell division cycle. The unraveling of the mechanisms for chromosome segregation should improve our understanding of various human diseases such as cancers and congenital disorders, which are characterized by chromosome instability and aneuploidy. To study chromosome segregation, we use budding yeast and human cells as model systems. Overwhelming evidence suggests that the basic mechanisms of chromosome regulation are well conserved from yeast to humans.

4 Year Wellcome Trust PhD Programme: Analysis of protein-protein interactions during meiosis

Gametes are formed by two successive rounds of cell division that occur after one round of chromosome replication. The first round (Meiosis I) separates the pairs of chromosomes, and the second (Meiosis II) separates the sister chromatids to produce the gametes, each of which has half the original amount of genetic information. Approximately 30% of human zygotes have abnormal chromosomal content at conception due to defects in meiosis. Such aneuploidy is a leading cause of miscarriages and other birth defects.

Pages