University of Dundee

Cell Signalling and Immunology

Short Code: 
CSI

From sleeping cell to assassin – how immune cells work

Scientists at the University of Dundee have carried out one of the most comprehensive studies into how immune cells sense and respond to their environment to fight infection and destroy tumours. The research team, who have published their findings in the journal Nature Immunology, said the results provide important insights into how immune responses might be manipulated for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer.

The Strange Case of AMPK and Cancer: Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde?

Prof. Grahame Hardie and two of his co-workers, Diana Vara-Ciruelos and Fiona Russell, have published a review in the journal Open Biology with a title inspired by the classic novella by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson. Their article discusses the controversial role in cancer of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which was first defined and named by Prof. Hardie at the University of Dundee in the late 1980s.

Postdoctoral Research Scientist

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral researcher to work on an exciting collaborative project between the University of Dundee and Professor Bart De Strooper’s lab at the Dementia Research Institute. The successful applicant will work with Dr Andy Howden in the Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology in the School of Life Sciences in Dundee to characterise the proteome of microglial cells during Alzheimer’s disease.

Postdoctoral Research Assistant

The School of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee is a world-class academic institution with a reputation for the excellence of its research, its high quality teaching and student experience, and the strong impact of its activities outside academia. With 900 staff from over 60 countries worldwide the School provides a dynamic, multi-national, collegiate and diverse environment with state-of-the-art laboratory, technology and teaching facilities.

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