University of Dundee

Latest News

June 2017

  • 16 Jun 2017

    Why do dogs have puppies, cats have kittens, and we have children with similar characteristics to ourselves? Because information is passed down through the genes, a library of instruction manuals on how to build all living things. Genes are made of the famous double-helical DNA molecule, that encodes information (the instructions) in its structure, in the order of the pieces (the "bases", of which there are four types) that make it up. RNA is similar, yet more dynamic, a worker rather than just a library. This is the basis of the science of genetics.

  • Tracy Palmer
    15 Jun 2017

    The University of Dundee’s Professor Tracy Palmer has been elected as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious scientific organisations. Professor Palmer is one among the outstanding 65 researchers from across the world to be honoured with election to the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO). The new intake is drawn from 19 European member states as well as Japan and the United States.

  • Mahima Swamy
    14 Jun 2017

    MRC PPU PI Mahima Swamy has been awarded a Sir Henry Dale Fellowship of £1.2 million to study the responses of the gut immune system to infection.

  • 14 Jun 2017

    Ten partnership building projects, including two from the School, have been awarded internal Pump-Priming Funding from the University’s SFC GCRF funding allocation. The aim of the competition, coordinated by Research & Innovation Services (RIS), is to enhance our ability to respond to funding opportunities under the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF).

  • Yogesh Kulathu
    12 Jun 2017

    Yogesh Kulathu from the MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit (MRC-PPU) has been awarded a 2017 Lister Research Prize. This prestigious and highly sought-after prize is given annually by the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine to up to five young researchers in the UK. These awards are intended to help support and nurture future leaders of biomedical research.

  • David Finlay
    08 Jun 2017

    Former Dundee researcher, Dr David Finlay, publishes recent findings in leading international journal Nature Communications. The work involved input from Dr Linda Sinclair from Professor Doreen Cantrell’s laboratory in the School who have a continuing collaboration with the Finlay group. Glucose – commonly referred to as a ‘simple’ sugar – may be a crucial factor in the fight against cancer and inflammatory disease after scientists discovered a new role for glucose in the stimulation of cells that work on the front line in the fight against infection and tumours.

  • Helge Dorfmueller
    07 Jun 2017

    Dr Helge Dorfmueller, from the Division of Molecular Microbiology, has won an award recognising the best research project funded by Tenovus Scotland. He has received the Sir Robin MacLellan Travel Award for his study 'Towards the discovery of chemical tools to prevent human infection caused by pathogenic Streptococcus pyogenes'. Dr Dorfmueller has been awarded £3000 towards the cost of travelling to a conference or symposium to enable the dissemination of Tenovus Scotland-funded research.

  • Teresa Cardote
    06 Jun 2017

    Teresa Cardote, a Ph.D. student, and Dr. Morgan Gadd, a former post-doctoral researcher in Professor Alessio Ciulli’s lab in BCDD, have had their research published in the Cell Press journal Structure. It reports a new crystal structure of a full Cullin RING E3 ligase (CRLs) complex. CRLs play important biological roles in physiology and disease, particularly in cancer, and are emerging as high-profile drug targets for the pharmaceutical industry.  

  • 05 Jun 2017

    Three researchers from the University of Dundee’s School of Life Sciences have been awarded grants totalling almost £3.5million to explore a range of subject areas. Professor Pauline Schaap has received a European Research Council (ERC) advance grant of £1.7million for her work exploring cell specialisms while Dr Constance Alabert was awarded a £1.1million ERC Early Career Stage grant to investigate the impact of DNA replication on epigenetics.

  • 02 Jun 2017

    The protein TRAF6 is essential for the operation of many physiological processes, ranging from the development of sweat glands and the formation of bone to the operation of the innate immune system.  TRAF6 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and, for many years, it has been widely accepted that it is this enzymatic activity that mediates the essential functions of the protein.

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