University of Dundee

all News

July 2019

  • Margarita Kalamara and Tom Snelling
    02 Jul 2019

    Two PhD students in the School have been selected to join Europe’s finest University students in creative and intellectual collaboration at Roche Continents 2019. The highly prestigious Roche Continents - a full week of interdisciplinary challenges and inspiration – selects only 100 students from the sciences and arts at European Universities to attend. Tom Snelling from Philip Cohen's Lab (MRC-PPU) and Margarita Kalamara from Nicola Stanley-Wall’s Lab (Molecular Microbiology) are two of those who will take part in the week of activities in Salzburg in August.

June 2019

  • Dr Samantha Budd Haeberlein with Professors Miratul Muqit and Dario Alessi
    21 Jun 2019

    The University of Dundee has today awarded an Honorary Doctorate to Dr Samantha Budd Haeberlein who is Vice President of Late Stage Clinical Development at Biogen. Samantha is a distinguished graduate of Dundee having obtained a First Class Honours Degree in Biochemistry in 1994 and then completing a PhD in 1997 under the supervision of David Nicholls FRS on the bioenergetics of neurons. Since then Samantha has flourished in the pharmaceutical industry over the last 20 years and emerged as a global leader in developing effective therapies against Alzheimer’s disease.

  •  Ian Kelsall and Jiazhen Zhang
    18 Jun 2019

    About 10 years ago, the discovery of the Linear Ubiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC) revolutionized our understanding of how the master transcription factor NF-kB was activated.  LUBAC a complex of the three proteins, HOIP, HOIL-1 and Sharpin, produces unique “linear” ubiquitin chains in which ubiquitins are joined to each other by peptide bonds.

April 2019

  • Dr Alan Prescott and the winning image
    23 Apr 2019

    Alan Prescott has been awarded third place in the annual British Society for Cell Biology (BSCB) image competition. His confocal image is of a cultured mouse embryo fibroblast from the mito-QC mouse. Mitochondria express both eGFP and mCherry but in lysosomes the eGFP, green fluorescence is quenched. Bright red dots are mitolysosomes. The nucleus is DAPI stained, blue. The image features in the Journal of Cell Biology publication from Ian Ganley's lab (McWilliams et al., (2016) JCB, 214(3).

  • Professor Kim Dale
    19 Apr 2019

    Latest research from Professor Kim Dale and collaborators has uncovered further knowledge into the developmental segmentation process which may also impact on our understanding of diseases such as cancer. This research was published this week in EMBO Reports.

  • Overview of the HaloPROTAC method to induce post–translational knockdown or endogenous proteins
    15 Apr 2019

    Hannah Tovell an Alessi lab PhD student working closely with the Ciulli lab has published an improved HaloPROTAC method to induce post–translational knockdown of endogenous proteins.  This approach makes use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to introduce a Halo tag onto the N or C terminus of any desired target protein that can then be targeted for degradation by a HaloPROTAC probe (see Figure). 

March 2019

  • Poster Prize Winners
    22 Mar 2019

    Last week, the School’s Annual Research Symposium was held at Crieff Hydro. The programme of talks and poster presentations covered the diverse research taking place in the School. Newly appointed Principal Investigators and Professors gave talks alongside more junior members of the School, who spoke as part of the SLS showcase sessions.

February 2019

  • Prof Hari Hundal, Dr Ian Ganley & Prof Rory McCrimmon
    01 Feb 2019

    Researchers from the Schools of Life Sciences and Medicine have been awarded a £275,000 grant from Diabetes UK. This inter-divisional and cross-School funding has been awarded to Professor Hari Hundal (Division of Cell Signalling & Immunology), Dr Ian Ganley (MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit) and Professor Rory McCrimmon (School of Medicine). 

November 2018

  • Dr Greg Findlay
    19 Nov 2018

    Dr Greg Findlay from the Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit (MRC PPU) and an associate of the Division of Cell Development and Biology has been awarded tenure today.

  • Professor Miratul Muqit
    07 Nov 2018

    Scientists in the School have confirmed that a key cellular pathway that protects the brain from damage is disrupted in Parkinson’s patients, raising the possibility of new treatments for the disease. Parkinson’s is a disabling disorder of the brain for which there is no cure. Mutations in two genes called PINK1 and Parkin are associated with early-onset forms of Parkinson’s. Both encode distinct classes of enzymes that play a pivotal role in protecting the brain against stress.

Pages